Vote for Optimism


Be different and think positively

Climate Change

We will soon have all electric cars and trucks reducing our carbon emissions to acceptable levels without government help. Incentivize our business communities with loans to create a statewide electrical recharging infrastructure. Encourage, don’t penalize our partners in innovation for our future needs. Get government out of the way of new ideas and ongoing development of renewable energy though the use of photovoltaics. Encourage battery development to store photovoltaic produced energy to get almost all residences OFF THE GRID. That is a true pragmatic approach to helping climate change and is coming without any government help. 

Affordable Housing

We need to rethink spreading out our population out over larger areas rather than constantly encouraging impacting existing infrastructure in our cities. We now or soon will have the ability to provide internet and energy almost anywhere of the planet. Why then do we need to further  continue to impact our crumbling city infrastructure by encouraging increasingly dense development? Create exclusion zones to reduce development costs and encourage innovation through competitive futuristic design solutions.

Infrastructure

Encourage above ground maglev-style mass transportation using smaller, faster cars and bus systems. Discourage old school railroad solutions. Fix existing infrastructure as this is the one element we all face every day which is failing. Individual electric vehicles may be a future solution.  We need to plan for a future with a new type of electric vehicle.

Cannabis

Cannabis should be packaged and treated just like tobacco products with FDA approvals etc.

Immigration

 It’s easy to tell illegal immigrants to get in a line, take a number, however the wait is longer than the DMV. Some people who applied back in 1987 are now receiving letters to become citizens. Will you not drive to work for 30 years waiting for a driver’s license? There is an obvious supply and demand problem but if illegal immigrants were not flooding in, then the wait list wouldn’t be so long because we’d be able to supply more spots legally. A chicken and egg problem. With our immigration system not adequately stopping illegal immigration, what do we do?

We must still celebrate legal immigration and citizenship.  So I support measures to secure the border, reform the legal immigration system, and uphold the rule of law.  I support legislation that keeps families together while at the same time devoting necessary resources to process claims. 

California Pension Debt

Public pension debt  doubled to more than $1.052 trillion in 2017, the last year of complete data.  That translates into $81,300 of pension debt per California household.  What is remarkable is the trend in pension debt has continued to climb even as the stock market has soared.

Another Great Recession-like downturn in the U.S. stock market could push California’s public pension system assets from $918 billion today to just over $700 billion. 

The average funded ratio for all public pensions in California would fall from 75% to 56.4% on an actuarial basis, meaning pensions would have just over 50 cents for every dollar in obligations.

Remember that this is the optimistic scenario. One thing is certain: Ignoring this problem won’t make it go away.  

Gary Michaels is a California leader who has the courage to acknowledge and implement ascertive and comprehensive reforms that are so clearly required.  

Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board pending Agriculture Order

A new set of regulations the Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board is considering includes changes to how farmers use groundwater, which will make operating difficult. This agricultural order is a follow-up to a previous order, which the board approved in 2017 and is set to expire on January 31, 2021. This new order must be approved before that expiration date. 

Agricultural Orders regulate the amount of contaminants allowed in water discharged from irrigated agricultural operations, establish monitoring and reporting requirements and provide methods of achieving compliance.

Specifically, they are designed to solve five water quality issues, including excessive nitrate discharges to groundwater, excessive nutrient discharges to surface waters, toxicity from pesticides in surface waters, discharge impacts on wetlands and riparian habitats and impacts on water quality impacts from excessive sediment discharges.

Regional boards usually revisit waste discharge requirements on a regular basis to consider updates, so there is no risk of regulatory coverage lapsing if they don’t.

The water board’s proposed new order is hard and severe and excessively regulates the local agriculture industry.